High Risk Pregnancy

A high-risk pregnancy is one in which the mother or the fetus has an increased chance of experiencing health problems during pregnancy or delivery. There are many factors that can make a pregnancy high-risk, including:
  • Maternal age: Women who are under 17 or over 35 are at a higher risk for complications during pregnancy.
  • Pre-existing medical conditions: Women with pre-existing medical conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, autoimmune disorders, or blood disorders are at a higher risk for complications during pregnancy.

 

 

  • Multiple pregnancies: Women who are pregnant with twins, triplets, or more are at a higher risk for complications such as preterm labor and preeclampsia.
  • Previous pregnancy complications: Women who have had previous pregnancy complications such as preterm labor, preeclampsia, or gestational diabetes are at a higher risk for these complications in future pregnancies.
  • Infections: Women who contract certain infections during pregnancy, such as rubella, cytomegalovirus, or toxoplasmosis, are at a higher risk for complications.
  • Lifestyle factors: Women who smoke, use drugs, or consume alcohol during pregnancy are at a higher risk for complications.

Pregnancies that are considered high-risk require specialized care and monitoring to ensure the health and safety of both the mother and the fetus. This may include more frequent prenatal visits, specialized testing, and interventions such as bed rest or medication. In some cases, high-risk pregnancies may require delivery by cesarean section or induction to minimize the risks to the mother and fetus.